Copyright © 2017 Burnham-on-sea Woodturning Club

Burnham-on-sea          Woodturning Club

Meeting Reviews

June 2017 - John Aitken

April 2017 - Chris Foweraker

March 2017 - Mark Sanger

February 2017 - George Foweraker

January 2017 - Paul Sweet

November 2016 - Jason Breach

October 2016 - Bryan Milham

September 2016 - Mark Sanger

August 2016 - Keith Fenton

July 2016 - George Foweraker

June 2016 - Chris Foweraker

June 2016 - Stuart Mortimer

April 2016 - Pete Moncrieff-Jury

March 2016 - Mark Sanger

February 2016 - Ray Blake

January 2016 - George Foweraker

December 2015 - Nick Agar

November 2015 - Paul Hannaby

October 2015 - George Foweraker

September 2015 - Mark Sanger

August 2015 - Jason Breach

July 2015 - Chris Foweraker

June 2015 - Nick Agar


June 2016 - Chris Foweraker

Having agreed at the start to not talk about the ‘elephant in the room’ (EU Referendum)!, Chris started his demonstration of the turning of a twisted stem candle holder. This followed on nicely from the Stuart Mortimer demo earlier in the month, but for those who did not attend that, it was an excellent chance to understand the basic techniques.


The stem was turned from a spindle of joinery quality deal, first by turning to round, then tapering so that the top end will be narrower than the base end, before marking up the twist area into 1/8ths vertically, 4 lines horizontally and then marking the 4 diagonal lines which will be used to cut the 4 spirals.













Each of the lines is marked 1 to 4 to assist in ensuring that each cut is made consistently to each spiral. Firstly, saw along the 4 lines in turn, not too deep, and ensuring not to go over the end lines which would cause problems getting rid of the cut lines in the latter stages.


Top Tip 1 - saw with the right hand whilst slowly rotating the spindle with the left hand ensuring that the same number of saw strokes are made at each turn.


Using a flat rasp, the grooves were then filed in turn and then again on the other side to make a V groove. The process was then repeated using a round profile Micoplane (available from Axminster Tools) until the required depth is achieved, all the while being careful to obtain a consistent width between each spiral.


The grooves were then sanded using 80grit paper abrasive wrapped around a flat stick with rounded sides so that on repeated applications the sides of the grooves are rounded over slightly and consistent inter-spiral consistency of width is maintained. Then using 3 twisted strands of 120grit cloth abrasive, smooth and soften the top, gradually moving down the grits up to 600grit.














The detail at each end was the finished and the 1” diam spindle parted off.


The base was then turned. A 1”diam hole having been pre-drilled with a Forstner bit into one end of the blank, the blank was mounted on a friction chuck and the bottom end drilled to take the assembly screw, countersunk and squared off with a slight hollow for stability of the base. The base was then remounted in a screw chuck and the base shaped.













The candle holder blank was mounted in the chuck, a 1” hole drilled through with a Forstner bit, the cup shaped from inside out and then about 1” parted off, remounted in the friction drive and the top shaped and finished.













Finally, the base was screwed to the spindle to complete a very attractive candlestick.






















Thanks to Chris for a very a professional demonstration creating a very attractive and useful candlestick.



David Langan