Copyright © 2018 Burnham-on-sea Woodturning Club

Burnham-on-sea          Woodturning Club

Meeting Reviews

August 2018 - Paul Sweet

July 2018 - Mark Sanger

June 2018 - John Lancaster

April 2018 - Liz Kent

March 2018 - Paul Hannaby

January 2018 - George Foweraker

November 2017 - Jason Breach

October 2017 - Tony George

September 2017 - Bryan Milham

September 2017 - AWGB

August 2017 - Mark Hancock

June 2017 - John Aitken

April 2017 - Chris Foweraker

March 2017 - Mark Sanger

February 2017 - George Foweraker

January 2017 - Paul Sweet

November 2016 - Jason Breach

October 2016 - Bryan Milham

September 2016 - Mark Sanger

August 2016 - Keith Fenton

July 2016 - George Foweraker

June 2016 - Chris Foweraker

June 2016 - Stuart Mortimer

April 2016 - Pete Moncrieff-Jury

March 2016 - Mark Sanger

February 2016 - Ray Blake

January 2016 - George Foweraker

December 2015 - Nick Agar

November 2015 - Paul Hannaby

October 2015 - George Foweraker

September 2015 - Mark Sanger

August 2015 - Jason Breach

July 2015 - Chris Foweraker

June 2015 - Nick Agar


August 2018 - Paul Sweet

Club member Paul made his second appearance at a club meeting to demonstrate how he makes his new range of pot pourri bowls, examples of which in Turkey Oak and Ash are below …






















Firstly, it is important to choose the right shape of wood!, namely that the two opposite edges should be of similar height otherwise the finished result will not appear balanced.


Having used a forstner bit to drill a hole in the bark end of the apple wood to allow the drive centre to grip tightly and to avoid bark tearout, mount the blank and flatten off the bottom using a bowl gouge. Mark and cut the tenon using a pull cut and shape the outside of the bottom half of the bowl from the bottom up. Then shape the top half of the bowl from the top down to avoid knocking the bark off and then blend the two halves together. Finally smooth off the outside surface using a finger-nail grind gouge or scraper.


Reverse on to the tenon and initially support on the tailstock and start to turn the outer indented ring.



Darth Vader in action!










Adjust the height of the centre dome and flatten. Mark out the diameter of the pot pourri cover, adjust the shape and depth of the outer ring and then hollow out the inner bowl to the required depth.


Top Tip 1 - Pot Pourri covers can be purchased from the likes of Yandles, Axminster Tools, Toolpost, Amazon, eBay etc but be careful, some are not as round as they should be!



The part turned shape before finishing










Top Tip 2 - As with any sanding operation, but particularly when sanding a “winged” piece such as in this demonstration, watch your fingers!


Having sanded the inner indented ring, Paul applied sanding sealer and then Chestnut Cut ‘n’ Polish before buffing with a buffing head held in a cordless drill.


Paul finished the bottom by using the outer ring of the chuck in an expanded mode to grip the inside of the inner opening. Obviously this method only works where the diameter of the pot pourri cover is appropriate for the diameter of the chuck. Using  a jamb chuck as an alternative may not work as Paul likes to leave a very thin lip on the inside of the inner opening which could be too fragile for jamb chuck use.


Paul’s objective for the demo was to show how his design for the pot pourri bowl could be implemented - he would normally spend some considerable time on the sanding and finishing processes, time not available during the demo.













To this end we were all fascinated by the creative skill that Paul demonstrated and I for one shall be having a go using an ideal piece of apple that I won on the evenings raffle!


Thanks Paul for an entertaining and informative evening.



David Langan